Security

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Security (in general)

E-mail Security Encryption Hacking Hoaxes Identity Theft Passwords
If you're the kind of executive who wants password-protected files that aren't trivial to break, Konevmik has good advice for you. "You should use additional cryptographic providers," he says, not just the default password methods offered by Microsoft and other software vendors. For example, you can create a Microsoft Word document that even Passware couldn't break into for years, if ever. To do this in Word 2003, click  File, Save As, then pull down the little-known Tools menu and choose Security Options. Clicking the Advanced button on the resulting dialog box gives you a choice of several "providers" or methods of encrypting the file. Selecting any method that uses 128-bit encryption gives you much stronger protection than Microsoft's default 40-bit key. "This increases the brute-force difficulty by thousands of times," Konevmik says.  That should be plenty of security for anyone, aside from the CIA. But you can store encrypted files on password-protected removable disks to add yet another layer of protection for absolute confidence.

Password Recovery:

Phishing & Spoofs & Scams & Fraud

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